Sora Radiology Unit

The UOC of Radiology of the PO of Sora carries out Radiological Diagnostic activities for hospitalized patients, coming from the PS or for external outpatient users. The UOC of Radiology also carries out activities in the field of breast screening, with a highly specialised team.

It is able to perform diagnostic tests with the use of the following methods, intended for the entire population:

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Diagnostic services for patients admitted and referred by the PS are insured 24 hours a day by means of a request entered on the RIS system.

Services under an agreement with the National Health Service are provided only upon presentation of the requesting doctor’s signature, drawn up on the appropriate regional model, through contact with the RECUP counters and/or the regional toll-free number 803333. Depending on the type of examination, additional health documentation may be required at the regional Recup.

In addition to the aforementioned requirement, at the time of acceptance the patient must be equipped with:

  • suitable valid identification document (identity card, driver’s license or passport);
  • national Health Service registration card or tax code;
  • documentation certifying the right to any exemption from the payment of the contribution to be paid by the assisted person (ticket);
  • any examinations previously performed.

Access to services in agreement with the National Health Service is also open to patients from other regions of Italy, in the same way and without further authorisations.

In any case, the benefit will be provided, at the sole discretion of the doctor in charge, only on condition that:

  • there are no contraindications to the provision of the required examination or therapeutic service;
  • the Patient has scrupulously followed all the possible preparatory phases of the examination;
  • the Patient provides, where necessary, his/her informed consent to the examination.

Any use of ionizing radiation for diagnostic purposes that involves exposure of the embryo and fetus is not allowed in women who are or are presumed to be pregnant. Patients are therefore obliged to inform both the reception staff at the time of booking and subsequent acceptance, and the medical staff at the time of carrying out the examination, of their pregnancy status (ascertained or suspected).

Emergencies

Radiology examinations that the family doctor or a specialist doctor requests with a Motivated Emergency priority code (any abuse will be prosecuted) take precedence in the booking, execution and delivery of the response.

Implementation

Presenting himself on the day and at the time indicated by the memorandum to the Secretariat of Radiology, the patient will be subject to the requested service.

The user, in case of inability to attend the examination, must promptly notify his/her absence also to the Recup, to allow other patients on the waiting list to take over. Similarly, any impediments of the public structure to the carrying out of the examination (for example due to equipment failures), bind the radiodiagnostic service to timely communication to the user through RECUP.

Payment

The payment of the prescribed sums must normally be made before the examination, presenting itself on the day set, already with the receipt of payment. The same will be carried out at the Ticket Office, without waiting for thelast minute (possible queues), with the risk of skipping the appointment.

Waiting Times

Waiting times to take advantage of the service vary depending on the type of service to be performed and depend on the availability of the RECUP lists; the booking staff, based on the waiting lists existing at the time of the request, provides the patient, on a case-by-case basis, with precise information on the availability of the Centre for the performance of the service. In the event of any possibility of anticipating the service, due to the resignation of other patients, it will be the responsibility of the RECUP secretariat to subsequently inform the patients on the waiting list.

Collection of Reports

The collection of diagnostic reports varies according to the type of examination and in any case a maximum period of seven working days following the examination is guaranteed; at the time of booking, the Patient is informed of the time of collection of the report.

The report must be collected directly from the Patient or from a person previously delegated by filling in the appropriate form available at the reception and provided with a suitable valid identification document.

The reports remain available at the reception of the Centre up to 30 days from the date scheduled for withdrawal; failure to withdraw the report relating to services provided under the agreement entails the necessary communication to the competent ASL which will charge the client the full cost of the service.

How to request and collect copies of the exams

The documentation relating to examinations performed in hospital or examinations performed on an outpatient basis may be provided to the user who requests it, as a copy, upon payment of the copy at the Ticket desk.

Reception times and days

The Service operates 24 hours a day, including holidays, with different testing times depending on the type of request.

  • Patients with a request from the Emergency Department: 24 hours a day;
  • Patients admitted with an internal request: from 08.00 to 20.00, excluding holidays if urgent, 24 hours a day if urgent;
  • Outpatients with the request of the attending physician: according to the type of examination, subject to reservation at the Recup, from 08.00 to 20.00, excluding holidays. CT scans are carried out from 07.00 to 20.00 on weekdays;
  • Reception: the acceptance, located on the ground floor, is dedicated to welcoming the patient both at the time of booking and of the provision of the service and the subsequent collection of the report; it is also entitled to provide the user with all the information and any clarifications. The facility has several waiting rooms. Observe the following opening hours: from 09.00 to 12.00 every weekday for the collection of reports, copies of exams and information.

Services / Activities provided

Conventional Radiology

Example: Chest radiogram

What is it?

It is an investigation that uses ionizing radiation to study the thoracic structures: the rib cage with the ribs, the lung and pleura, the large vessels of the mediastinum, the heart and the small circle. The chest radiogram was one of the first applications of X-rays and, to date, is one of the fundamental investigations and most frequently used in clinical practice. No other examination, in fact, allows the chest to be explored so quickly and in any clinical situation, even in an emergency, in the face of a very modest cost and biological risk from irradiation.

The examination technique has undergone a constant evolution, especially in the last twentyyears; the objective has been to improve the quality of the images and at the same time reduce the dose of radiation delivered to the patient: starting from a traditional film, similar to a photographic film, technological evolution is now paving the way for digital radiology that facilitates the acquisition of high-quality images.

Why do it?

The indications on examination are multiple: chest pain, respiratory difficulty, the suspicion of a cardiovascular problem, the presence of diseases in other organs or districts but which can also affect the chest, the prospect of surgery, the control of critical patients…

There are so many indications on the chest radiogram that one of the problems that has recently emerged is precisely that of avoiding its indiscriminate use when the diagnostic and therapeutic benefit is modest or even absent.

The indications on the radiogram in the hospitalized patient are quite peculiar, often modulated by specific needs related to the reason for hospitalization or to the diagnostic and therapeutic practices implemented during it.

When is it not done?

Like all instrumental investigations, the chest radiogram should not be carried out in the absence of a precise diagnostic question: we remember in particular the need to limit routine examinations still required today in categories of patients without specific risks.

Before the exam

Before the examination, no preparation of the patient is necessary. However, any radio-opaque objects (necklaces, chains) must be removed from the chest and the examining operator must be informed of the presence of skin formations (snows, warts) that can simulate the existence of pulmonary opacity. The patient should briefly inform the examiner of the problem under investigation and mention any previous chest diseases, including traumatic events, or if he/she suffers from cardiovascular problems. It is often very useful – and saves unnecessary radiation – to compare with any previous radiograms, which must therefore be recovered by the patient and delivered at the time of the examination.

How does it work?

The examination is performed, whenever possible, on an erect patient. In the frontal projection radiogram, the front of the chest is rested on the cassette, the chin slightly raised, the arms resting on the hips with elbow cones moved forward to avoid overlapping of the shoulder blades. The patient is invited to take a deep breath and maintain the apnea for a few moments while the x-ray is performed. The lateral projection, when necessary, is carried out with the side resting on the box and the arms raised. As needed, radiograms can also be obtained in different obliquities, possibly under the control of radioscopy.

After the exam

There is no precaution or therapy to be followed after the examination; the radiogram is examined by the radiologist, who assesses whether the investigation answers the clinical question or whether it is appropriate to carry out a radiological (e.g. CT scan) or other diagnostic examination (e.g. specialist pulmonological examinations).

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Ultrasound

What is it?

Echotomography or ultrasound is a method of investigation that produces images of the human body using ultrasound (very high frequency sounds), thanks to their reflectivity by the different body tissues: the principles underlying the eame are the same as radar and sonar. The most sophisticated equipment makes it possible to analyse reflected ultrasound (echoes) in greater detail, also obtaining information on the flow of blood in the scanned organs (echo-Doppler, color-Doppler, Power-Doppler).

Under the conditions of the examination, the crossing of the tissues by ultrasound does not produce appreciable biological consequences: for this reason, no harmful effects attributable to ultrasound have been documented so far, which can therefore be considered a risk-free examination and without any contraindication.

Why do it?

Ecotomography can be usefully used in the study of all parenchymal organs and some hollow organs (stomach and bladder) of which it is able to specify the structural alterations resulting from numerous diseases.

In particular, ultrasound can highlight nodules of different nature, as long as they reach appreciable dimensions (5-10 mm). Ultrasound is not indicated in the study of organs surrounded by bone or air (which ultrasound cannot cross) and must be preceded by other investigations under certain conditions (for example, in selected cases, breast ultrasound must be performed to complement mammography in women over 35-40 years of age).

Before the exam

For the study of the abdominal organs (in particular liver and gallbladder) it is good practice to follow, in the 3 days before the examination, a slag-free diet (do not take vegetables and fruits, cheeses and carbonated beverages) and observe absolute fasting for at least 5 hours before the examination (water and medicines can be taken freely). On the other hand, for the study of the pelvic organs (bladder, uterus and ovaries, prostate), it is necessary to have a full bladder (having finished drinking 1 litre of water about 1 hour before the examination). In particular conditions (study of abdominal and pelvic organs in patients suffering from constipation) it is advisable to carry out a cleaning enema. No preparation is required for all other exams.

How does it work?

The examination is neither painful nor annoying: the radiologist spreads a conductive gel on the skin surface above the section to be explored and moves the probe that emits/receives ultrasound on it; the examination lasts 10-20 minutes, during which the patient must avoid movements and must, at certain times and at the request of the examiner, hold his breath.

After the exam

Once the examination is finished, the patient must not follow special regimens or prescriptions and can immediately resume his normal activity. The radiologist may recommend repeating the examination after carrying out a more thorough preparation, if the one carried out was not sufficient.

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Mammography

What is it?

It is a particular X-ray of the breasts that uses a low dose of X-rays, thanks to modern equipment and the particular sensitivity of both the films used and the reinforcement screens. Precisely because of the low dose of X-rays, mammograms can be performed periodically, without significant biological risks (this allows the examination to be repeated even once a year, starting after the age of 40-50 depending on the case).

It does not cause pain, at most only a slight and momentary discomfort for the delicate compression system on the breast, necessary to obtain sharper and more precise images and to limit the absorbed dose.

Why do it?

Mammography is the main method in the study of breasts and makes it possible to diagnose breast neoplasms even at an early stage, when their treatment determines complete remission. In fact, this technique makes it possible to identify tumours when they are still initial, sometimes a few millimetres in size, still not palpable or documentable with other medical examinations. Precisely because of the ability of mammography to diagnose very small tumors, it becomes the ideal and indispensable test for the control of all women over 40 years of age.

Before the exam

It is not necessary to fast on the day of the examination or to have observed special dietary rules in the previous days. The phase of the menstrual cycle is not conditioning for the quality of the images; however, it is preferable to perform the mammographic examination avoiding the periovulatory (mid-cycle) and/or premenstrual phase if the breast is particularly painful during these periods. It is advisable to avoid the local use of any type of cosmetic, oil, cream and especially talc, in the hours before the examination.

Although mammography uses very low doses of X-rays, it should not be performed during pregnancy, especially in the first trimester; therefore, avoid the examination if it is not possible to safely rule out an initial pregnancy.

How it takes place

The mammographic examination is generally performed in an upright position, with the breast bare, resting one breast at a time on a special shelf with an adjustable height. The appliance causes a slight compression on the gland that improves the quality of the mammographic image. Normally, two X-rays are taken for each breast with top-down and oblique footage, for a complete view of the entire gland. The examination lasts a few minutes and can also be completed by a specialist breast examination.

After the exam

Once the mammogram is completed, there are no signs or skin changes on the breasts, pain and there is no recommendation to observe in the following days, nor therapy to be done.

Sometimes the radiologist may also request, to complete the mammogram, an ultrasound examination, which is never a substitute, but complementary, because it is focused on radiographic images.

The radiographic films, the document of the examination carried out, must be stored with extreme care, not folded, rolled, wet or pressed under weights and presented at each subsequent medical check-up.

Mammography examination may be repeated, again at the discretion of the attending physician, every 1-2 years in women aged between 40 and 50 years annually after the age of 50.

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T.A.C.

What is it?

It is a diagnostic examination that, using complex X-ray equipment, allows sections of the investigated body region to be reconstructed on the computer. Hence the name tomography, which means image in section.

To make the anatomical structures in question more analyzable, it is often necessary to resort to contrast medium, which is administered orally (in the form of an almost tasteless drink) and intravenously.

The examination does not cause any pain, except for the slightest unpleasant sensation related to the introduction of a needle into a vein (necessary for the administration of the contrast medium).

Why do it?

It is a defined second-level examination, that is, aimed at clarifying diagnostic doubts of a certain importance, to which the simplest and least expensive radiological and ultrasound examinations have not provided a definitive answer. Computerized Tomography can be used in any body district: it is generally able to visualize the skeleton and joints with sufficient completeness without the need to resort to contrast medium. For the remaining districts, however, it is very often necessary to use contrast medium with intravenous administration and, for the study of the abdomen, also oral contrast.

Before the exam

Depending on the type of examination, laboratory tests may be necessary to document cardiac function (Electrocardiogram), renal function (Creatinine) and obtain the electrophoretic tracing of plasma proteins.

In the event of having to resort to contrast medium, on the day of the examination it is advisable to be fasting for at least 5 hours. In addition, for patients of childbearing potential, the examination should only be performed if pregnancy status can be excluded.

What to tell the radiologist?

It is very important to report the symptoms that led to the examination and to show all the radiological and ultrasound examinations performed previously. In the event that the examination is repeated after a period of time, it is necessary to report the previous CT scan. The radiologist must be able to consult the results of any other instrumental examinations or specialist visits and – if available – the report of the attending physician or discharge letters issued on the occasion of previous admissions. It is also necessary to report to the radiologist the existence of any allergies and if there have been reactions to the contrast medium in the past.

How does it work?

To perform the examination, the patient is invited to lie down on the bed, relax and minimize voluntary movements. Throughout the exam, it generally does not exceed 15 minutes. In many circumstances the patient may be asked to remain in apnea for a few seconds. During the examination, the bed on which the patient is lying is slid into a very large doughnut, which contains the equipment necessary for image acquisition. During the examination, the movement of some components inside the doughnut produces a slight noise, which in any case is not annoying.

After the exam

Once the examination is completed, the patient must not follow special regimens or prescriptions and can immediately resume his normal activity.

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Computerized Bone Mineralometry (MOC)

What is it?

Computerized Bone Mineralometry (MOC) is a modern diagnostic investigation technique, the purpose of which is to evaluate the state of bone mineralization.

The examination allows to measure the density of the bone mass by detecting the degeneration of the structure. In this way it is possible to make an early diagnosis of osteoporosis before fractures occur.

Why do it?

The MOC DEXA Total Body provides information on the amount of body fat, fat mass and total bone mass. These data make it possible to essentially establish the physical characteristics of the patient.

This examination can therefore be useful in the following clinical situations: obesity, developmental abnormalities, primary and secondary hyperthyroidism, anorexia, muscular dystrophy, Cushing’s syndrome, etc. Thanks to the assessment of body composition, patients immediately know what risks they run and can follow the evolution of the treatments they undergo.

The MOC DEXA of the lumbar spine is suitable to evaluate trabecular bone (spongy), that of the femoral neck to evaluate cortical bone (compact).

Before the exam

Before the examination, no preparation of the patient is necessary, but any radio-opaque objects (necklaces, chains) must be removed from the chest.

It is often very useful – and saves unnecessary radiation – to compare with any previous radiograms, which must therefore be recovered by the patient and delivered at the time of the examination.

How does it work?

The MOC is performed in a very short time, about three minutes: the patient is made to lie on a bed where the X-ray emission instrument, located under the mattress, is coupled to a movable arm that contains the ray detector and that runs along the body.

After the exam

Once the examination is completed, the patient must not follow special regimens or prescriptions and can immediately resume his normal activity.

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NMR

What is it?

Magnetic Resonance is an investigation strongly indicated in the study of soft tissues; it is a diagnostic investigation that provides very detailed and high-contrast images of the human body. In this it is similar to other radiological investigations, such as CT, but with respect to this it detects even very small differences in the water content of organs and tissues, allowing to appreciate minimal differences in structure of the areas examined.

Magnetic Resonance, therefore, is able to highlight even minor differences in the composition and structure of the various devices and also anomalies of the same, thanks to the very high contrast resolution with which it is equipped; in fact, it allows to distinguish very well within a tissue, minimal alterations that often correspond to pathological states.

Why do it?

MRI is particularly useful in the study of diseases of the brain and spine, abdomen and pelvis (liver and uterus), large vessels (aorta) and musculoskeletal system (joints, bone, soft tissues).

However, it is a study strongly indicated for the study of soft tissues (nervous system, heart, liver, parenchymal organs) rich in water and, therefore, in hydrogen atoms and less so for hard, water-deficient structures, such as bone. The most recent application developments of MRI also consist in the functional study of some organs, such as the production of images of activation of the cerebral cortex following stimuli of various kinds; another recent application, the search for the presence of biologically active substances, or metabolites within organs or apparatuses, called in vivo spectroscopy. This is very useful in degenerative diseases, but also in neoplastic diseases and functional alterations.

Before the exam

Depending on the type of test, laboratory tests may be necessary to document kidney function. In the event of having to resort to contrast medium, on the day of the examination it is advisable to be fasting for at least 5 hours.

What to tell the radiologist?

It is very important to report the symptoms that led to the examination and to show all the radiological and ultrasound examinations performed previously. In the event that the examination is repeated after a period of time, it is necessary to report the previous MRI. The radiologist must be able to consult the results of any other instrumental examinations or specialist visits and – if available – the report of the attending physician or letters of discharge issued on the occasion of previous admissions. It is also necessary to report to the radiologist the existence of any allergies and if there have been reactions to the contrast medium in the past.

How does it work?

The exam consists of several scans, each lasting about five minutes, with a short pause in between. The entire procedure has a variable duration depending on the part of the body examined.

  • “you will be asked to lie down on a cot and we will make sure you feel comfortable as you will have to stay still. It is not a painful examination but quite noisy because of the particular equipment – if this were to cause a disturbance we have noiseproof headphones and earplugs available “;
  • for safety reasons, the companion is not allowed to enter the room while the examination is in progress.

After the exam

Once the examination is completed, the patient must not follow special regimens or prescriptions and can immediately resume his normal activity.

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Contacts

The Radiodiagnostic Service is located on the ground floor of body C; it can be reached through the main entrance and through access to the clinics.

Outside the Hospital there are public parking areas reserved for the disabled, stretchers and first aid vehicles. Internally, the structure has adopted all the necessary measures to break down architectural barriers (elevator, ramps to compensate for differences in level, facilitated routes, bathroom).

Manager: Dr Carlo Pirolli

Sora Office

  • Address: SS Hospital: Trinità – Località San Marciano 03039 Sora (FR)
  • Radiology Acceptance Phone: 0776.8294119
  • Telephone TAC Service: 0776.8294110
  • MRI Service Phone: 0776.8294116
  • Fax: 0776.8294115
  • Email: radiologia.hsora@aslfrosinone.it

Last Updated: 01/04/2022

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